Sermons

Reverend Marjorie Brown 19th August 2018

A few days ago I watched an excellent film called Apostasy, telling the story of a mother and her young adult daughters who are devout Jehovah’s Witnesses. It was written and directed by a man who grew up in that faith. In the film, the older daughter strays from the path and is disfellowshipped by the community; this requires her mother and sister to cut off contact with her as well. The younger daughter meanwhile has her faith tested in a profound way around the issue of refusing blood transfusions. I won’t tell you what happens in the story because I would really encourage you to see it yourselves. It’s a truly thoughtful and compassionate account of what it means to be formed as a human being by the teachings of one’s faith – in this case, a faith that is ultimately destructive of family relationships and personal flourishing. Continuing reading

 

Ros Miskin, 5 August 2018

How often have we heard the words ‘seeing is believing’?  It implies that we need tangible proof in order to believe that someone or something exists.

Examples of such a need are found throughout the Gospel of John.  John writes that near the time of the Jewish Festival of Booths the unbelief of Jesus’ brothers prompt them to say to him: ‘Leave here and go to Judea so that your disciples may see the works that you are doing, for no-one who wants to be widely known acts in secret’.  Then there is doubting Thomas who says of Jesus ‘Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands, and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side I will not believe’.  In Matthew’s Gospel the disciples are seeking the sign of the Second Coming and the end of the age. In today’s world we too look for signs continuously to reassure us and to help us find a way forward.  It can be emotional, such as looking for a sign of life in a badly injured person or practical in driving along a road and looking for road signs to get us to our destination.  It may also be spiritual in looking for a sign of God’s presence in a shrine or on a landscape.” Continuing reading

 

Pentecost 2018 St Mark’s  – William Gulliford 20 May 2018

Yesterday, Lady Jane Fellowes, sister of the late Diana, Princess of Wales read at the wedding of her nephew, Prince Harry, from King Solomon’s Song of Songs:

Set me as a seal upon your heart, a seal upon your arm, love is as strong as death, passion as strong as the grave. Its flashes are flashes of fire, a raging flame…” Continuing reading

 

A letter from Revd William Gulliford to the new Bishop of London:

“Dear Bishop Sarah, My Lord Bishop,

I think we still address you formally as Lord, but it is significant that we can greet you personally and by your name. I don’t know how many Bishop Sarahs there have been in the life of the Church, but certainly you are the first for London. Alleluia! …” Continuing the reading

 

The Theology of the Land with a focus on Reconciliation

A keynote address by Dr. Clare Amos at the conference: ‘Homeland? Exploring the heritage of the Balfour Declaration’, 21st October 2017

There is a wonderful saying of Archbishop Michael Ramsey that I often find myself drawing on when I want to encourage lay people to believe that they, or should I say ‘we’ – as well as clergy – have the right and duty to reflect on questions of theology. Continuing the reading

 

Ros Miskin, Christian Unity, January 2017

“The theme of my sermon today is unity. I have chosen this theme as we are now in the middle of the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity which seeks to reconcile the pain of deep divisions affecting the unity of the church, following the many divisions in the history of the church.”  Continuing the reading 

 

Revd Dr Matthias Grebe, Remembrance Day,  November 2016

“The Battle of the Somme raged for 141 days. More than a million men were killed or wounded, making it one of the bloodiest battles in history. And this year marks the centenary of what has been seen as the beginning of modern all-arms warfare.

As a German working as a priest in the Church of England, ‘Remembrance Day’ always arrives with rather mixed feelings..” Continue the reading

 

Revd William Gulliford 16 October 2016 Trinity XXI 

“I’d like you to hold in your mind three fight- related images which are presented to us in today’s readings. First from today’s Old Testament reading the night time wrestling even between Jacob and the un-named man. Second, the picture from this morning’s Gospel reading of the importunate widow addressing the unjust judge, and then her punching him in the eye. And third that picture which this morning’s Old Testament reading gives us of Jacob, newly named Israel, holding his hip in pain, limping away from the scene at Penuel”. Continue the reading

 

Revd William Gulliford22 May 2016, TheSunday after the Ascension 

“And behold, I come quickly.” Rev 22: 12 . This Sunday after the Ascension is the opportunity to look back at the moment of Our Lord’s departure from the sight of his Disciples and the sending of His Spirit, on the Feast of Pentecost, which we mark next week, and which concludes the Easter season.

And so this is something of an in-between moment, a pause, a time of waiting. Continue the reading

 

Revd William Gulliford, 05 May 2016, The Feast of the Ascension St Mary’s Primrose Hill

“And he withdrew from them and was carried up into heaven” . Ascension Day is a magnificent and triumphant celebration of Christ’s Kingship and enthronement in his proper place at the right hand of God the Father. Continue the reading

 

Revd William Gulliford, 23 January 2016, Sermon for the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity  Christchurch Eldon Road SW7

“Un membre du corps souffre-t-il? Tous les membres souffrent avec lui. Un membre est-il a l’honneur ? tous les membres se réjouissent avec lui. » Continue the reading

 

Revd William Gulliford20 December 2015 Advent IV Year C 

Words repeated in chapter 2 of Luke’s Gospel, our Gospel of this year: “But Mary kept all these things, pondering them in her heart.” 

 

Sermon Fr Matthias, 25 October 2015

I always think that preaching on the Bible is a little bit like building a sand castle in front of the Tower of London. The best you can ever hope to do is to catch the eyes of those who are looking down instead of up, and in doing so, point them towards the real deal. Continue the reading 2015-10-25 Sermon Fr Matthias

 

Good Friday 10 April 2015

Jesus before his Jewish and Roman judges is both judged and judge, condemned and the one who himself condemns.I want to reflect with you on one person in particular with whom Jesus has to do in these final hours. Spare me one or two moments of improbable exploration on this journey, just so as to excavate these familiar yet dense narratives. Our Orthodox brothers and sisters next week, will not have a liturgy of this kind. They wait until the Evening of their GoodFriday and then instead of pondering the nature and significance of Our Lord’s death, as is customary in the West, instead using the burial rite of the dead, they adorn an ornamental shroud with as many flowers as it can bear and process it around the church,before as it were burying it on the altar.

The person of the High Priest, Caiaphas, and connected with him his father in law Annas holds a particular fascination for me. Perhaps it is because I spend part of my life interviewing potential priests that the character of the High Priest who tried Jesus intrigues me. Continue the reading 2015-03-03 Good Friday – Caiaphas

 

01 March 2015 – Sermon for Lent II Readings: Genesis 17.1-7, 15, 16 Romans 4.13-25 Mark 8.31-38 by William  Levanway 

“Righteousness comes by faith not by the law. The law brings God’s wrath, but faith brings righteousness, justification, the promises of God made real in our lives. What are these words: ‘faith’, ‘righteousness’, ‘justification’, ‘wrath’? What do they mean? What do we mean when we say them? What does Christ mean when he gives his blunt judgement: ‘Whosoever will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me. For whosoever will save his life shall lose it; but whosoever shall lose his life for my sake and the gospel’s, the same shall save it.’ (Mark 8.34b-35)? “Read entire LentIISermon

 

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